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Past morphs to present in museum photo exhibit

An exhibit of images that change before the viewer's eyes will offer an unusual perspective on Fairfield's past and present in an exhibit opening this month at the Fairfield Musuem and History Center.

"Fairfield Back & Forth" opens on Thursday Dec. 19 featuring the lenticular photography of Westport artist Miggs Burroughs.

In the lenticular process, Burroughs layers two images with a special plastic laminate, museum officials said. When a viewer passes by, one images changes to the other.

With that technique, Burroughs has created a series of dual-image scenes of Fairfield landmarks -- many of them pairing historical photos with present-day images. Examples include:

"Firehouse, 1910-2012," which morphs from the circa 1910 Fairfield Hook and Ladder Co. on Reef Road into the present day Firehouse Deli.

"Fountain 1910, 2012," which shows the Southport fountain at Main Street and Harbor Road then and now.

"HiHo 2010, Day & Night," which shows the iconic Motel Hi-Ho sign (the Merritt Parkway Motor Lodge) in daylight and lit up against a dark sky.

The exhibit will open Dec. 19 with a free reception with the artist from 5 to 7 p.m. Burroughs will discuss his work, and wine, eggnog and other refreshments will be served, museum officials said.

The exhibit will run through Feb. 18.

"This exhibition provides another creative way to view the changing landscape within our community," Mike Jehle, the museum's executive director said in a news release. "Miggs' lenticular images are a fitting addition to the museum as our mission is to use the power of history to inspire the imagination."

Burroughs first began experimenting with lenticular imagery more than a decade ago, seeing it as a way to tell a meaningful story with just two images, according to the release.

"After searching for a story-telling medium that was perfectly suited to my creative impulses and abilities, the lenticular process showed me the way," he wrote in a recent blog post. "For me, the appeal of lenticular imagery is the emotional journeys it can evoke."

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